Thursday, April 04, 2013

R.I.P. Roger Ebert

It's a sad day as film critic Roger Ebert has passed away today at the age of 70. Ebert's passion for film has had a tremendous effect on cinephiles, critics and probably everyone that reads this site. Though he was lukewarm on "The Master" (which I'm pretty convinced might have changed if he had given it a second viewing), he's always been a supporter of Paul and his films. Watch all of his televised reviews of PTA's films below and leave your memories of the man in the comments. 



Punch-Drunk Love

 
Magnolia

 
Boogie Nights 

 
Hard Eight 



"The Master" is now available on Blu-ray and DVD.    
Stay tuned to Twitter and Facebook for the latest news and updates.

10 comments:

  1. Oh God, what a sad day!

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  2. I don't know if you saw his 10 best films of 2012 list, but he did give The Master an honorable mention, so it's hopefully possible! Still, film and film criticism has lost one of its greats today.

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  3. Loved him and Siskel too. He was a fine combination of down-to-earth moviegoer and film scholar (even if he didn't love The Master). His reviews brought me to many fine films I might not otherwise have checked out. Remember the year he gave his #1 best film of the year award to "One False Move".

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  4. Two thumbs up Roger! Two thumbs up! I always felt he was the everymans film critic. His commentary on the Citizen Kane blu-ray is energetic and insightful. RIP Brother.

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  5. He did indeed include THE MASTER on his honorable mentions despite a slightly negative 2.5 star review (out of 4). Not sure if this indicates a typo or a change of heart. I remember a few years back when his initial site posting of his ten best lists categorically included THE BOUNTY HUNTER (which he gave 1.5 stars) - it was quickly corrected. While THE MASTER is still on the list and he may have admired it more by the end of the year, who can say?

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  6. Mike Kaplan: When I returned to America after being in Europe during the 70s, I felt things were OK and safe here because Johnny Carson was still on The Tonight Show, providing continuity and commentary. Though Roger Ebert was no longer on television after becoming a national icon, his impact remained as strong as ever through his writings and mastery of the social media, which provided a similar continuity for anyone who loved the movies. He expanded, educated and entertained us with an honesty and a rare common sense analysis, which is no longer common. Like Carson, he was a cultural touchstone. I feel less secure knowing I won't be reading his tweets tomorrow.

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  7. Not certain Roger saw THE MASTER again but he was always supportive, and tweeted BEYOND CATEGORY (below)

    Roger Ebert @ebertchicago 30 Dec
    Sight & Sound sez "The Master" is year's best. Mike Kaplan sez what he thinks about that, Kubrick, and other matters. huff.to/TroNL7
    View summary ·

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  8. I got to meet Roger Ebert at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. He was a really cool guy just mingling with people in the lobby of the Eccles theater and asking them the question he got asked the most; "what's your favorite film so far?" It was a really nice moment in my life and I am very happy to have experienced it.

    R.I.P. Roger. You will be missed.

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