Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Cigarettes & Red Vines presents: A Guide To 70mm


Ever since we first heard that PTA would be shooting “The Master” (at least partially) in 70mm, we’ve gotten a lot of questions on what exactly that means for the film. We recently learned that “more than half” of the film was shot on 70mm and so, with the film’s release almost upon us, we’ve decided to provide a user’s guide to getting a basic understanding about the large format and hopefully clear up any confusion.

We spoke to in70mm.com editor Thomas Hauerslev as well as filmmaker Craig Whitney (who spent some time on the set of Terrence Malick's “The Tree Of Life,” portions of which were filmed in 70mm) to get all the answers you might need. Because we got such great information from both sources, we’ve decided to present two different ways to absorb the info: the first part is an brief history of the format while the second part is a more direct Q&A. Enjoy.

Part One

Part Two 

Part Three

You can find a full listing of all theatres showing "The Master" in 70mm here.

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9 comments:

  1. Wow. This is invaluable. Thank you so much!

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  2. Agreed. Very helpful introduction into the world of 70mm.

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  3. Definitely needed this, thank you.

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  4. Where is your source that confirmed that the film will definitely be presented in 1.85:1?

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  5. Original 70mm film is a great invention, but it should be presented on slightly curved large screens from floor-to-ceiling and from wall-to-wall just as the late Michael Todd has intended.
    Most cinemas that still have the equipment (or re-installed it for The Master””) to show 70m in those days have a too small screen.
    Nowadays 4K projection looks great and will be the future, but original 70mmfilm is different and Paul Thomas Anderson has experienced and proven that for sure! We have promoted ourselves original 70mm filming since 1994 with our promotional publications. See www.70mmpublishers.nl.
    Let us hope that Anderson or another director”/producer or cinematographer will keep “the flag flying” for original 65/ 70mm filming. It would be a pity to destroy all those beautiful Panavision, Todd-AO and other 65mm cameras. And there will always be people who like film better than digital, despite its improvements.
    Johan C.M. Wolthuis, publisher, International 70mm Publishers. Arnhem, The Netherlands

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